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Yay for the older mother...a positive look for once!

Posted by Karen Faulkner on
Yay for the older mother...a positive look for once!
Older mothers get bagged in the press all the time and the maternity unit calls them such disparaging names as elderly primigravida (old mum, first baby).

My little sister had these names banded at her and once I saw this article in last weeks Sydney Morning Herald (SMH), I felt it needed an airing.

http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/older-mothers-take-a-bow-study-finds-your-children-get-better-start-20120917-262po.html

Yes we are aware that as we get older, so do our eggs. But so many of us fail to find a good man at the crucial optimum childbearing time of our 20's.

What are we to do? Freeze our eggs for later use in case we struggle to find the 'one'?

Or do we just hang on in there and hope?

This article gave me hope and it had a lovely positive message for a change.

Hallelujah sisters!

As we get older we often are more financially secure and we have aspired and achieved in our chosen careers. We may have travelled and done our rite of passage, the round the world trip and then, finally in our mid to late 30's we finally found the one.

This article was based on an English research study. It found that children born to older mothers, over 40 years, 'benefitted from improved health and language development up to the age of five'.

They also had less hospital admissions and accidents. They were more likely to be up to date with their immunisations by the age of 9 months and had fewer emotional and social issues.

I say YAY for the older mother. See it's not all bad out there.

This research was conducted by The University College London's Institute of Child Health and looked at data from more than 70,000 children and it got published in the British Medical Journal. Now that is indeed a pure GOLD  publication.

The key finding was that the higher educated a mother was, the better off financially and in a stable home, that this was the biggest predictor of positive outcomes for children.

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