This will take many of you by surprise. And I’m sure that many of your baby’s and toddlers are eating this very common food. I’m sure if you knew how counter-productive it was in helping them sleep you’d think twice about giving it to your little ones by itself and just before a nap or bedtime.

I’m doing a public service today to highlight this issue and how you can promote your baby’s sleep with much cleverer food choices. It’s all in the mix! Food combining is key.
This little blog came about because I come across so many little ones just having yoghurt for breakfast.

You might remember my previous blogs talking about the correct ratio for each meal. The ratio that helps baby’s sleep better.

https://www.nurtureparenting.com.au/diet-and-baby-sleep/

And the culprit of sleep sabotage is … drum roll, please …YOGHURT!

We all know that yoghurt has calcium in it and calcium is very important for those growing bones and teeth. Calcium also can convert tryptophan into melatonin. Melatonin is that neurotransmitter that helps your baby get to sleep and stay asleep. It’s triggered by darkness and can be produced by eating foods high in tryptophan. These include banana’s, turkey, cheese, whole wheat, avocado etc.

Here’s a previous blog on calcium and did you know the best food source for calcium is not dairy its TOFU!

https://www.nurtureparenting.com.au/calcium-in-foods-and-what-your-baby-toddler-needs/

Calcium is also important for nerve impulses, and a deficiency may interrupt sleep. However, yoghurt has a lot of the enzyme/amino acid tyrosine and tyrosine is know as a waker/perker upper. Aha, you say! So giving baby yoghurt by itself is not conducive for baby and toddler sleep! It’s actually keeping babies awake?! Correct!

So if yoghurt is not helpful for sleep by itself how can you pair it with other foods to get optimum sleep promotion?

Here are a few examples of good food combining with yoghurt for sleep

  • Whole grain cereal such as Weetbix with milk and yoghurt and banana
  • A bowl of oatmeal with milk and yoghurt add LSA (linseed, sunflower and almond mix) and quinoa for protein and fruit
  • Oatmeal raisin cookies and yoghurt
  • Apple with cheese, oatmeal biscuit or cracker and yoghurt
  • Yoghurt with granola, add some flaxseed or ground LSA
  • Banana and yoghurt with LSA mix or oats
  • Date or banana bran muffin with yoghurt
  • Yoghurt, oats, full cream cows milk, strawberries and banana and LSA

Baby sleep and food balance are very important. Get that balance right and your baby or toddler is on their way to the land of sweet dreams and good baby sleep.

For a heap of NEW ideas hop on over to the Nurture & Nourish section of my new Nurture Sleep Program. There is an amazing eBooklet with 219 pages of nutritious recipes to promote your baby’s sleep.

You can also access even more of my 3 decades of experience as a registered midwife and child and family health nurse via the Nurture Sleep Program. You can take your baby from sleepless to slumber in up to 7 easy lessons across 3 age groups once you join.

https://nurtureparenting.com.au/nurture-sleep-program

🍌 FOODS that promote baby sleep
ROUTINE: easy, flexible, sleep-ready
💡 ENVIRONMENT: getting it right
👶🏽 DEVELOPMENT: changes, how these affect sleep
😴 SLEEP METHODS: secret tips that will change your life

It will stop the guesswork and give you:

A tried and tested approach (20 years of helping families with baby & toddler sleep)
Evidence-based
Gentle baby sleep methods
Holistic assessment
Nurture & Nourish nutrition program – all recipes have sleep-inducing ingredients and a perfect balance for a good nights sleep
Access to a closed Facebook group for one on one support from Karen and 90+ timecoded Facebook Live videos
Prevention for under 4 months so no need to do sleep training ever
And all at a low $97 for a very limited time

Scroll down for links to some more helpful blogs on getting diet working to support baby and toddler sleep.

Baby Food Pouches and Baby Sleep Problems

Desserts Helping Babies and Toddlers Sleep

 

Helping your baby sleep with diet

Calcium – what your baby & toddler needs